A Dictionary of Literary And Thematic Terms by Edward Quinn

By Edward Quinn

In transparent, non-technical language, this dictionary of greater than 1,000 literary phrases and issues takes an elevated view of the time period "literary." This ebook provides readers not just a standard literary vocabulary, but in addition the information of similar theoretical, old, and cultural phrases they want within the interdisciplinary global of up to date literary experiences. New entries comprise: conventional literary phrases and topics, corresponding to individualism, skepticism, and the Odysseus/Ulysses subject matter; literary subject matters that experience turn into more and more well known lately, resembling terrorism and criminal literature; and topics perennially well known between writers, reminiscent of alcoholism, baseball, and vampirism. good points comprise: clean definitions and examples of ordinary literary and comparable phrases equivalent to meter, antagonist, and New feedback; essays on significant subject matters in literature similar to evil, energy, love, loss of life, time, and extra; phrases with regards to multicultural and feminist literature; significant modern theoretical phrases, with transparent definitions and examples; tradition phrases from movie, tv, psychology, background, and different fields regarding literature; references for extra studying; and wide cross-references

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The 20th century has seen a proliferation of autobiographies of the “tell all” variety by celebrities of every type. Among more serious examples of the form are Sean O’Casey’s, written in the third person, and Simone de Beauvoir’s five-volume account of her life. In the United States, undoubtedly the most significant autobiography of the post-war period has been The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965), written by Alex Haley and based upon taped interviews with the American civil rights leader. Roy Pascal’s Design and Truth in Autobiography (1960) and John Pilling’s Autobiography and Imagination (1981) are recent studies of the form.

Writers in England in the first half of the 18th century invoked a parallel with Rome to describe the literature of their period. They promoted the writings of Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Joseph Addison, and Richard Steele not only for their intrinsic merits but also as models of “correct” literature as defined by the doctrines of NEOCLASSICISM. The period also saw the development of a distinctly nonneoclassical form, the NOVEL. Major practitioners of the newly developed genre included Daniel Defoe (Robinson Crusoe, 1719; Moll Flanders, 1722); Samuel Richardson (Pamela, 1740–42; Clarissa, 1747–48), and Henry Fielding (Joseph Andrews, 1742; Tom Jones, 1749).

Failure to speak clearly; failure to sit up straight; failure to get up in the morning; failure in attitude; failure in ambition and ability; indeed in everything. His own failure. ) The modern prototype (he even uses the term anti-hero to describe himself) is the anonymous, first-person narrator of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Notes from Underground (1864). Locked in his room, the underground man records his rage and humiliation as he rails against the prevailing belief in human reason and scientific progress.

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